• This topic is empty.
Viewing 1 post (of 1 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #2961

    How is the font determined for this CSS and the role of body selector
    byu/DigitalSplendid inweb_design

    Comment
    byu/DigitalSplendid from discussion
    inweb_design

    Comment
    byu/DigitalSplendid from discussion
    inweb_design

    Comment
    byu/DigitalSplendid from discussion
    inweb_design

    Comment
    byu/DigitalSplendid from discussion
    inweb_design

    Comment
    byu/DigitalSplendid from discussion
    inweb_design

    Comment
    byu/DigitalSplendid from discussion
    inweb_design

    Comment
    byu/DigitalSplendid from discussion
    inweb_design

    Comment
    byu/DigitalSplendid from discussion
    inweb_design

    CSS font

    Source ChatGPT:
    Sure! The CSS rule * { font-family: "Comic Sans MS"; } uses the universal selector * to apply the specified font family to all elements on the web page. Let’s break down this rule in detail:

    Universal Selector: *

    The universal selector is represented by an asterisk *. It matches every element on the web page, meaning that any styling rules applied with the universal selector will be applied to all HTML elements, unless overridden by more specific rules later in the stylesheet.

    Property: font-family

    The font-family property in CSS specifies the typeface that should be used for the text within the selected elements. In this case, you are setting the font-family to “Comic Sans MS”, which is a playful, informal font.

    Application

    Here’s a step-by-step explanation of what happens when you use the universal selector with the font-family property:

    1. Selection of Elements: The universal selector * selects all elements on the web page. This includes everything from the <body> element to <div>, <span>, <p>, <h1>, <a>, and every other HTML element.
    2. Font Application: The font-family: "Comic Sans MS"; rule is applied to each of these selected elements. This means that the text within every element on the page will be displayed using the “Comic Sans MS” font, unless a more specific rule overrides this setting.

    Specificity and Overriding

    CSS rules can be overridden by more specific selectors. For example:

    * {
        font-family: "Comic Sans MS";
    }
    
    body {
        font-family: "Courier New";
    }
    

    In this example, the body element will use “Courier New” instead of “Comic Sans MS” because the body selector is more specific than the universal selector. However, all other elements will still use “Comic Sans MS”.

    Inheritance

    Some CSS properties, like font-family, are inherited by child elements from their parent elements. This means that if you set a font-family on the <body>, all child elements within the body will inherit that font unless they have their own font-family rule.

    For example:

    * {
        font-family: "Comic Sans MS";
    }
    
    body {
        font-family: "Courier New";
    }
    p {
        font-family: "Arial";
    }
    
    • The body will use “Courier New”.
    • All elements within the body will inherit “Courier New”, except <p> elements, which will use “Arial”.
    • All other elements not specifically styled (e.g., <div>, <h1>, etc.) will use “Courier New” because they inherit it from the body.

    Practical Implications

    Using the universal selector with font-family is a quick way to set a default font for your entire web page. However, it’s often better to set default styles on the body element and use more specific selectors as needed for better control and to avoid potential issues with specificity and overriding.

    Example of setting a default font more appropriately:

    body {
        font-family: "Comic Sans MS";
    }
    

    This approach ensures that all text on the page uses “Comic Sans MS” by default, but allows for more specific overrides when necessary.

Viewing 1 post (of 1 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
Scroll to Top